An employee engages in an investigation seeking anonymity. They give key evidence but after being advised that we might not be able to maintain anonymity they want to withdraw their statement. Where does the employer stand?

Posted in : First Tuesday Q&A NI on 1 December 2015
Emma-Jane Flannery
Arthur Cox

If the witness asks to remain anonymous, you should explore the reason for this request and any underlying motive. There are a number of reasons why someone may request anonymity: they may genuinely be fearful of violence or other repercussions or simply may not want to be seen as a 'snitch'. You should always establish the reason for any reluctance as well as consider the possibility that the employee or witness may have reason to fabricate, or otherwise embellish, the evidence they give.

Consider taking steps to protect the witness's identity, such as redacting their evidence to remove

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Back to Q&A's This article is correct at 01/12/2015
Disclaimer:

The information in this article is provided as part of Legal-Island's Employment Law Hub. We regret we are not able to respond to requests for specific legal or HR queries and recommend that professional advice is obtained before relying on information supplied anywhere within this article.

Emma-Jane Flannery
Arthur Cox

The main content of this article was provided by Emma-Jane Flannery. Contact telephone number is 028 9023 0007 or email Emma-Jane.Flannery@arthurcox.com

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